Monthly Archives: June 2011

The myth of efficient, decisive military intervention

Protecting civilians in Libya was never going to be a simple assignment. Getting Libya on a path toward stability and a society characterized by democratic participation and respect for human rights obviously promises to be a lot more difficult. From … Continue reading

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From Bombs to Diplomacy: the Parliamentary debate on Libya

The importance of diplomacy to resolve the Libyan crisis received prominent attention in this week’s debate on extending the protection mission in Libya,[i] but the Government still hasn’t bought into one basic reality – that right now the more urgent … Continue reading

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Libya, the regime change dilemma, and the Parliamentary Debate

There was all-party agreement in March on the House of Commons motion[i] in support of Canadian participation, for three months, in the UN-mandated protection mission in Libya, and while there are not sufficient grounds for withdrawing that support now, there … Continue reading

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R2P: cover for unilateralism or entrenchment of multilateralism?

Does the responsibility to protect doctrine (R2P) provide cover for unilateralist and imperialist adventures by major powers in pursuit of their own interests?  A new conference report[i] argues the opposite – that R2P’s strict requirement for UN-authorized collective intervention actually … Continue reading

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Towards a nuclear spring in the Middle East

It is potentially one of the most far-reaching recent nuclear disarmament developments – in 2010 the NPT Review Conference renewed the international commitment to pursue “a Middle East zone free of nuclear weapons and all other weapons of mass destruction.” … Continue reading

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